Introduction

While Morton Sobell was serving a thirty-year prison sentence as a co-conspirator of the Rosenbergs, his wife, Helen, observed that the two of them were actually happier than many couples living in freedom. Sobell agreed, but cautioned his wife against expressing such an idea to others, lest it be m...

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Published in: Romantic Outlaws, Beloved Prisons p. 1
Main Author: Martha Grace Duncan
Format: Book Chapter
Language: English
Published: NYU Press 11-01-1996
Subjects:
Law
Online Access: Get full text
Summary: While Morton Sobell was serving a thirty-year prison sentence as a co-conspirator of the Rosenbergs, his wife, Helen, observed that the two of them were actually happier than many couples living in freedom. Sobell agreed, but cautioned his wife against expressing such an idea to others, lest it be misunderstood. People, he thought, “would say we were nuts, or even worse. Anyway, happiness is never as easy to explain as unhappiness.”¹ Recognizing that his and his wife’s response to his imprisonment was paradoxical, Sobell feared that other people would reject their experience as invalid—a theme we see again in