Conclusion

Twentieth-century depictions of Gershwin tended toward one of two scenarios. The first viewed him as a childlike genius who scaled the heights without benefit of formal instruction, a modest and somewhat naive man scorned by disdainful critics and envious colleagues. The second regarded him, more da...

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Published in: George Gershwin p. 701
Main Author: Howard Pollack
Format: Book Chapter
Language: English
Published: University of California Press 12-16-2006
Edition: 1
Subjects:
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Summary: Twentieth-century depictions of Gershwin tended toward one of two scenarios. The first viewed him as a childlike genius who scaled the heights without benefit of formal instruction, a modest and somewhat naive man scorned by disdainful critics and envious colleagues. The second regarded him, more darkly, as a flawed genius incapable of sustained study, but ambitious and vain and eager for critical approbation. That both stereotypes were in a number of ways diametrically opposed helped underscore their basic inadequacy: for Gershwin, it might be argued, was thoughtful and generous, if evidently self-absorbed; more tactful than not; artistically adventurous and open-minded;
ISBN: 0520248643
9780520248649
DOI: 10.1525/j.ctt1ppk6n.42