Introduction

In the late eighteenth century, after the Americans severed the bonds of empire, the problem of Indian-white relations reached a point of crisis. For most Indians, it had always been so. As the white man advanced and gathered strength, the native tribes receded. Some disappeared in the violence of w...

Full description

Published in: Seeds of Extinction p. 3
Main Author: Bernard W. Sheehan
Format: Book Chapter
Language: English
Published: The University of North Carolina Press 01-01-2014
Subjects:
War
Online Access: Get full text
Summary: In the late eighteenth century, after the Americans severed the bonds of empire, the problem of Indian-white relations reached a point of crisis. For most Indians, it had always been so. As the white man advanced and gathered strength, the native tribes receded. Some disappeared in the violence of war, some partially adapted to civilized ways and lived a truncated existence on the borderland between the two societies, some disintegrated slowly from disease and social malaise until the remnants joined one of the surviving tribes. Of course, some native peoples endured and even thrived for a time in close association
DOI: 10.5149/9780807839911_sheehan.4