Chapter 7 - The Newt as a Model for Eye Regeneration

One animal model can regenerate virtually anything, and more importantly throughout adulthood, is the newt. The newt is an indispensable model for the study of the eye for this reason. Two main components of the eye that are readily studied in the newt are the lens and the retina. Retina and lens re...

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Published in: Animal Models in Eye Research pp. 93 - 101
Main Authors: Roddy, Meagan, Tsonis, Panagiotis A
Format: Book Chapter
Language: English
Published: Elsevier Ltd 2008
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Summary: One animal model can regenerate virtually anything, and more importantly throughout adulthood, is the newt. The newt is an indispensable model for the study of the eye for this reason. Two main components of the eye that are readily studied in the newt are the lens and the retina. Retina and lens regeneration occurs in some species of frog but, here again, only through early development. Newt offers a unique and interesting opportunity to study regeneration of the eye from larvae into adulthood stages. The complex mechanisms of regeneration in the newt involve processes of transdifferentiation. It is necessary to also mention that although the newt is a very valuable model for regeneration research, it is also a challenging model due to slow progress in genetic and molecular biology research and the scarce availability of resources. Lens regeneration also involves transdifferentiation of the pigmented epithelial cells of the iris, or pigmented epithelial cells (PECs). The PECs re-enter the cell cycle, dedifferentiate, and lose their characteristic pigmentation. In vivo, regeneration occurs from the dorsal iris population of PECs. Despite the apparent similarity between the dorsal and ventral PECs, the ability to regenerate through transdifferentiation under normal conditions belongs exclusively to the dorsal PECs.
ISBN: 0123741696
9780123741691
DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-374169-1.00007-2