The injustice of territoriality

In recent works Nancy Fraser has developed a model of 'metademocracy' that promises to reconcile the competing claims of universal justice (grounded in human rights) and localized democracy (grounded in popular sovereignty). By instituting a global democratic procedure in which all enjoy p...

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Published in: Critical review of international social and political philosophy Vol. 15; no. 5; pp. 631 - 648
Main Author: Muldoon, Paul
Format: Journal Article
Language: English
Published: Routledge 12-01-2012
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Summary: In recent works Nancy Fraser has developed a model of 'metademocracy' that promises to reconcile the competing claims of universal justice (grounded in human rights) and localized democracy (grounded in popular sovereignty). By instituting a global democratic procedure in which all enjoy participatory parity, Fraser hopes to ensure that some people are not denied standing as 'subjects of justice' simply because of their territorial location while keeping faith with the democratic commitment to autonomy and self-legislation. Despite the compelling nature of this model, I argue that Fraser fails to bridge the gulf between justice and democracy because her model of metademocracy is built on the 'metanorm' of 'participatory parity'. Drawing on the work of Hannah Arendt, I claim that this foundationalist move re-asserts the priority of justice over democracy because it takes equality as a moral given rather than the ever-precarious achievement of human organization.
ISSN: 1369-8230
1743-8772
DOI: 10.1080/13698230.2012.727309