The effect of the Tomatis Method on the psychological well-being and piano performance of student pianists : an exploratory study

Features inherent in the training of student pianists may contribute to their psychological vulnerability, especially regarding self-concept and anxiety. Julie Nagel (2009, 15) points out that unlike other professions that can be entered into later in life, a musician's training usually commenc...

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Published in: South African music studies : SAMUS Vol. 30-31; no. 1; pp. 129 - 158
Main Authors: Taljaard, Hannes, Du Plessis, Wynand
Format: Journal Article
Language: English
Afrikaans
Published: Matieland Musicological Society of Southern Africa 2010
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Summary: Features inherent in the training of student pianists may contribute to their psychological vulnerability, especially regarding self-concept and anxiety. Julie Nagel (2009, 15) points out that unlike other professions that can be entered into later in life, a musician's training usually commences during childhood. She also points out that because learning to play an instrument starts at an early age, social and physical maturation as well as ego development occur simultaneously with the development of the musician's technical skills (Nagel 2009, 16). Consequently, various dynamics that could be adaptive or maladaptive have coalesced by the time the learner pursues a career in music (Nagel 2009, 16). These dynamics include psychological and social factors such as motivation for learning, influence of parents and teachers, music performance examinations and competitions, as well as the demands of practice (Vercueil 2010, 24-33).
ISSN: 2223-635X
0258-509X
2223-635X