Worldview, the credit crisis and the “unity of life": From “framework” to “deep commitment"

The term 'worldview' harbours different dimensions that are not always clearly distinguished. A worldview can be considered to be a personal matter, but it may also be a more collective phenomenon, as it can manifest itself for example within a certain sphere of life (e.g. politics or econ...

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Published in: Koers (Potchefstroom, South Africa) Vol. 77; no. 1; pp. 1 - 9
Main Author: Buijs, GJ
Format: Journal Article
Language: English
Portuguese
Afrikaans
Published: Scriber Editorial Systems 2012
Subjects:
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Summary: The term 'worldview' harbours different dimensions that are not always clearly distinguished. A worldview can be considered to be a personal matter, but it may also be a more collective phenomenon, as it can manifest itself for example within a certain sphere of life (e.g. politics or economics) as a full-blown ideology or a more implicit 'embedded worldview'. A second distinction can be made between the dimension of a deep, existential commitment and that of an encompassing mental framework, between spiritual inspiration and a more or less intellectually coherent system. There may be tensions between these various dimensions. Having a worldview as a person may imply being in conflict with other worldviews that are embodied in certain social fields. How can people deal with these conflicts? One can easily be seduced to avoid the conflicts and to shift gears between them. With the credit crisis and economics used as an illustration, this article explores some of the techniques that people - consciously, semi-consciously or unconsciously - may employ to navigate the differences between various social domains and their inherent worldviews. In order to support people to regain some unity, the notion of worldview may still be helpful, but interpreted primarily as 'deep commitment'.
ISSN: 0023-270X
2304-8557
2304-8557
DOI: 10.4102/koers.v77i1.186