HOW PREPARED ARE SOCIAL WORK PRACTITIONERS FOR BEGINNERS’ PRACTICE? REFLECTIONS OF NEWLY QUALIFIED BSW GRADUATES

The establishment of social work qualifications in South Africa emerged at a few universities from 1937 onwards (Earle, 2008; Nicholas, Rautenbach & Maistry, 2010; Potgieter, 1998). In accordance with Section 18A (1) of the Social Service Professions Act (No. 110 of 1978), up until 1987 a social...

Full description

Published in: Social Work Vol. 49; no. 4; pp. 469 - 489
Main Author: De Jager, Mariana
Format: Journal Article
Language: English
Afrikaans
Published: Stellenbosch University 05-23-2014
Subjects:
Online Access: Get full text
Summary: The establishment of social work qualifications in South Africa emerged at a few universities from 1937 onwards (Earle, 2008; Nicholas, Rautenbach & Maistry, 2010; Potgieter, 1998). In accordance with Section 18A (1) of the Social Service Professions Act (No. 110 of 1978), up until 1987 a social worker required a three-year degree, after which a four-year qualification was required. At some institutions the introduction of a fourth year was included in the undergraduate programme, while others added the fourth year as a separate Honours qualification. This system allowed social workers to gain registration through a range of bachelor’s qualifications in the arts, social sciences or social work. At the time the need for a standardised qualification for all social workers to meet the requirements of practice settings became a growing concern to all the different stakeholders.
ISSN: 0037-8054
2312-7198
DOI: 10.15270/49-4-39